Hunter Moore Launches New Porn Revenge Website

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If you've never heard of Hunter Moore, then thank God. Moore is the creator of a "revenge porn site" called IsAnyoneUp.com, where jilted lovers could post embarrassing X-rated pictures of each other.

The BBC named Moore "the Net's most hated man," Facebook banned him for life, PayPal blocked him and Anonymous has tried to hack his site.

In May, the FBI presented Hunter with a warrant to search for evidence of hacking.

He sold IsAnyoneUp.com to Bullyville.com eight months ago, but has now created a new porn revenge site, reports The Guardian.

Moore says that his new site will solicit nude pictures and post them online, without the subject’s consent. On is new website HunterMoore.tv, Moore wrote: “I am creating something that will question if you will ever want to have kids.”

Moore hasn't gone to jail and often hides behind the Communications Decency Act of 1996, section 230, which states: "No provider or user of an interactive computer service shall be treated as the publisher or speaker of any information provided by another information content provider."

However, Mary-Rose Papandrea, an associate professor at Boston College law school, told The Guardian: “He’s not operating in a legal vacuum where he’s free from potential legal problems. Section 230 doesn’t protect the people who actually provide the content. So that means that anyone who provides a photo to Hunter Moore’s website or any other website – Reddit, whatever it might be – section 230 offers them no protection whatsoever.”

“There’s also a possibility that section 230 will not protect people like Hunter Moore himself because there have been some courts increasingly willing to read an exception into Section 230 for ISPs [Internet Service Providers] or websites that have facilitated the posting of content that violates tort law or other law.”

Roommates.com was sued by the Fair Housing Council of San Fernando Valley, which thought their questionnaire violated the Fair Housing Act. A court ruled that Roommates.com was not protected by section 230 because users could discriminate based on the questionnaire.

Papandrea adds: “It’s not clear necessarily that Hunter Moore’s [website] would fall within this roommates.com exception, but it could."

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