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7-Eleven Clerk’s Response To Seeing Soldier’s Military ID Left Him Stunned

Photo Credit: KIRO via The Blaze

Photo Credit: KIRO via The Blaze

Note: we are republishing this story in light of recent reports that have highlighted heightened tensions between active duty service members and workers across the country. 

A soldier in Washington state said he was denied service at a convenience store after showing the clerk his military ID.

Collin Brown, a reservist in the Army, went to purchase a Slurpee and a pack of cigarettes at a Redmond, Washington, 7-Eleven, according to KIRO. When the cashier asked to see his ID to confirm his age, he set his military ID on the counter.

"[The cashier] said, 'You're in the military?'" Brown recalled. "I said, 'Yes.' She said, 'I can't serve you.' Honestly, I was in shock. I asked, 'Are you serious?' She looked at me like she was offended."

Brown asked what the problem was and pulled out his driver's license for another form of identification. Then, when he asked for the store manager's information, the cashier allowed him to make the purchase.

Brown only told his fiancé about the incident, but word soon spread to friends and family, some of whom posted about it online. The posts spread to thousands of people around the country. The clerk's actions outraged many.

"I think it's understandable that people would be upset about it," Brown said, according to KIRO. "I think anyone in this position would be upset."

7-Eleven responded to the incident, initially claiming the story was "distorted."

"A customer presented a military ID as a form of identification and the store associate could not clearly read the birth date," the company's corporate office said. "In this instance, the store associate, by law, asked to see a second form of ID."

Brown said that is not what happened, however, claiming that the clerk never told him she could not read his date of birth. He then called for 7-Eleven to investigate the incident further by checking store surveillance tapes. He also suggested 7-Eleven retrain its employees.

7-Eleven's corporate office issued another statement regarding the incident:

It's clear that a misunderstanding occurred at a franchised 7-Eleven store. We understand that a customer presented a military ID as a form of identification when buying age-restricted products, and the Franchisee’s store associate could not clearly read the birth date. In this instance, the store associate, by law, was required to ask to see a second form of ID with a birthdate. After the customer's age was verified, the transaction was completed. Serving members of the military, being named a top military-friendly company and employing military veterans are great honors for 7-Eleven.

The franchise owner of the Redmond 7-Eleven at which the incident occurred also issued a statement.

"We sincerely apologize for a misunderstanding that occurred at one of our stores," the statement read. "A customer presented a military ID as a form of identification and the store associate could not clearly read the birth date. In this instance, the store associate, by law, asked to see a second form of ID. After the customers age was verified the transaction was complete."

Sources: KIRO

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