Technology
Technology

Executive Porn-Watching A Common Cause of Corporate Malware

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A new survey by ThreatTrack Security reveals that one of the most common causes of corporate malware is pornography viewed by top executives.

ThreatTrack polled 200 data security analysts in the United States, and found that “nearly 40% had to remove malware after a senior executive visited an infected pornographic website.”

Although viewing porn at work may not do much for productivity, it isn’t just the top brass who’s watching. In a survey by Harris Interactive released in 2011, about 3 percent of Americans admitted watching pornography at work. And not just men were guilty of on-the-clock online adventures; the number of males who admitted to the deed was only 20 percent higher than the number of women.

Data indicates that many more people are watching porn at work and not admitting it. According to the Nielsen company, 21 million Americans had accessed X-rated material via their work computers in the month of March 2010. That comprises 29 percent of workers over the age of 18.

Beyond porn, the ThreatTrack survey shows that phishing is a huge problem.

According to the report, “56% of the malware analysts have had to remove malware from their companies’ senior leaders’ PCs after those leaders infected their own devices by clicking on a malicious link in a phishing email.” This makes phishing the single most common source of malware in corporate environments.

Other top causes of malware in the office include infected USB drives or smartphones. A whopping 45 percent of respondents also reported removing malware after an executive let a family member use their computer. Perhaps some execs are trying to cover their own pornography tracks by blaming relatives?

Disturbingly, the survey reports that 57 percent of security analysts have worked on a security breach that the company hid from their customers or stakeholders.

Sources: ThreatTrack, Huffington Post