Parenting
Parenting

Supreme Court Turns Down Internet Child Porn Law

| by DeepDiveAdmin
After weeks of consideration the Supreme Court Wednesday dismissed the Child Online Protection Act, effectively ending any chance the law had of going into effect 13 years after it was first proposed.

The Child Online Protection Act was intended to curb access to pornography by making it a crime for sexually explicit Web sites not to install some form of age verification system in order to keep out children.

However, several free speech advocates, including the ACLU, thought the Act went too far by limiting free speech and expression on the Web, without substantially protecting children. In addition, they pointed out that parents can individually install filters that would similarly block their child's access to pornography, an argument lower appeals courts agreed with.

Despite the Bush administration's repeated pleas that the Supreme Court allow the law to take effect, today's ruling leaves the Internet a largely unregulated forum for free expression.

To watch a video from the ACLU explaining how it was able to convince the Supreme Court that the Act was unconstitutional, click here.

Does pornography harm America? To read the Opposing Views debate, click here.

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