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Manny Pacquiao vs. Timothy Bradley: A Sense of Entitlement

| by Alex Groberman

Everyone in the world was surprised when two incompetent judges decided to give Timothy Bradley an undeserved victory over Manny Pacquiao.

If you go by the chorus of boos that rained down on the ring in the aftermath of the decision, it’s safe to say that fans were surprised. If you go by the scathing headlines that were written in every major publication on the morning of June 10th, it’s safe to say that the sportswriters were surprised.

And if you go by the fact that, right after his fight wrapped, Bradley allegedly told Bob Arum that he didn’t think he had won the bout, it’s safe to say that Bradley himself was surprised.

Or at least it used to be safe to say that.  

A couple of weeks after Arum -- the guy who promotes both Pacquiao and Bradley -- said Bradley told him that he had felt as he lost the fight in the seconds after the final bell rang, Bradley came out with his own spin:

"I told Bob I did the best I can. I got injured. That was it. That's all I said to Bob. I didn't say, 'Bob, I couldn't beat that guy,'” Bradley told Fight Hype.

“He's a liar and I will tell him that to his face," said Bradley.

And the tough talk didn’t end there. Here is what Bradley’s trainer, Joel Diaz, had to say to Examiner.com's Chris Robinson (via Paul Magno):

"I don't even want to talk about Bob Arum," Diaz told Robinson. "It's just sad that he signs a fighter, he promises him everything...and when [expletive] like this goes down, he turns his back on you.

"I don't know if he's playing mind games," Diaz continued. "I don't know if he did that just to cover up, because, at the end of the day, he's a promoter and he's the one that pays the money. He's the one that signs the checks. He's the one that hires the officials."

In the aftermath of what transpired on June 9th, once the anger subsided a bit, fans found themselves in a tough spot. Bradley seems like a good person. The sort of good person you would normally root for, even. But that good guy quality becomes a lot less apparent when he -- and his representatives -- opt to adopt the “We deserved to beat Manny” attitude.

No, they didn’t deserve to beat him. We know it. You know it. And, most importantly, they know it. The idea of Bradley going to Arum once his fight wrapped and telling him that he felt as though Pacquiao had beaten him is totally believable.

Bradley is no fool – he knows when he earns wins and when he doesn’t.

This arrogance and weird entitlement to a victory that he didn’t deserve isn’t a good look for Bradley. He doesn’t have to go around apologizing for what happened, but he doesn’t have to be so blatantly in-your-face about it either.

From here on out, he should just avoid broaching the topic altogether. And if he doesn’t? Well, then he runs the risk of alienating a lot of fans who might otherwise have sort of liked him.

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