Politics
Politics

SPLC Wrong: Family Research Council No 'Hate Group'

| by Illinois Family Institute

Oh, for the good old days when the term "hate group" referred to groups that actually hated someone.

Now the term "hate group" refers to any group that expresses political, philosophical, moral, or theological beliefs with which the far-left Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) disagrees.

Last week, the SPLC released the winter issue of Mark Potok's ironically named "Intelligence Report."

The article "18 Anti-Gay Groups and Their Propaganda" by Evelyn Schlatter lists 18 organizations as "anti-gay" groups with 13 of those to be added to their formal list of "hate groups." The American Family Association, Family Research Council, and the Illinois Family Institute are three of the 13 that will be included on a list with neo-Nazi organizations.

Schlatter explains that the "propagation" of "known falsehoods" about homosexuality will result in organizations being included on the SPLC's "anti-gay" list and perhaps also their "hate groups" list. Here are the "known falsehoods" that she and co-author Robert Steinback cite in the companion article "10 Anti-Gay Myths Debunked":

  • If an organization claims that homosexuals "molest children at far higher rates than heterosexuals," it goes on the SPLC's "hate groups" list.

  • If an organization says that "same-sex parents harm children," it goes on the SPLC's "hate groups" list.

  • If an organization claims that "people become homosexual because they were sexually abused as children or there was a deficiency in sex-role modeling by their parents," it goes on the SPLC's "hate groups" list.

  • If an organization claims that "homosexuals don't live nearly as long as heterosexuals," it goes on the SPLC's "hate groups" list.

  • If an organization claims that "homosexuals controlled the Nazi Party and helped to orchestrate the Holocaust," it goes on the SPLC's "hate-groups" list.

  • If an organization claims that "hate crime laws will lead to the jailing of pastors who criticize homosexuality and the legalization of practices like bestiality and necrophilia," it goes on the SPLC's "hate groups" list.

  • If an organization claims that "allowing homosexuals to serve openly would damage the armed forces," it goes on the SPLC's "hate groups" list.

  • If an organization claims that homosexuals "are more prone to be mentally ill and to abuse drugs and alcohol," it goes on the SPLC's "hate groups" list.

  • If an organization claims that "no one is born a homosexual," it goes on the SPLC's "hate groups" list.

  • If an organization claims "Gay people can choose to leave homosexuality," it goes on the SPLC's "hate groups" list.

Under each of these "myths," Schlatter and Steinback offer analyses and evidence of such poor quality that their arguments wouldn't pass muster in many high school English classes in which there are actual standards for logic and use of evidence. I will examine just a few of the many problems in their analyses, which in turn will reveal the intellectual and ethical vacuity that pervades the SPLC.