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Society

South Carolina: Bystanders Must Help Cops Making Arrest (Video)

| by Michael Allen

South Carolina residents are required to assist police officers, if requested to do so, according to a new report (video below).

WNCN noted that a recent broadcast of the A & E show "Live PD" showed a police officer struggling with suspect Bryan Martin, who led deputies on a high speed car chase in Richland County, South Carolina.

After his car crashed, Martin exited the vehicle with his 2-year-old daughter. Martin and a deputy fought over the toddler, which resulted in a broken arm for the little girl.

While this all happened there were bystanders, including the A & E production crew, filming the incident.

In its report, WNCN said that South Carolina residents are required by state law to help the police, or they can be charged with a misdemeanor:

Image result for cop making arrest

Any sheriff, deputy sheriff, constable or other officer specially empowered may call out the bystanders or posse comitatus of the proper county to his assistance whenever he is resisted or has reasonable grounds to suspect and believe that such assistance will be necessary in the service or execution of process in any criminal case and any deputy sheriff may call out such posse comitatus to assist in enforcing the laws and in arresting violators or suspected violators thereof.

Any person refusing to assist as one of the posse comitatus in the service or execution of such process, when required by the sheriff, deputy sheriff, constable or other officer shall be liable to be indicted therefor and upon conviction shall be fined and imprisoned, at the discretion of the court any person who shall fail to respond and render assistance when summoned by a deputy sheriff to assist in enforcing the laws and in arresting violators or suspected violators thereof shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction shall be fined not less than thirty nor more than one hundred dollars or imprisoned for thirty days.

In more police news, unidentified police sources told KARE that Officer Matthew Harrity was "stunned" when his partner, Officer Mohamed Noor, opened fire on an innocent woman, Justine Damond, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on July 14.

According to the sources, Noor reached across Harrity -- inside their police car -- to fatally shoot Damond, who was dressed in her pajamas; Damond had called 911 because of suspected assault.

Image result for being arrestedThe community is upset because the police department has not officially released much information since the shooting, notes the Star Tribune.

According to the newspaper, Minnesota state law requires the release of the 911 call, but the city has refused to do so.

Police Chief Janee Harteau, who has been out of town, publicly asked the state Bureau of Criminal Apprehension to perform a speedy investigation into the shooting.

Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges has refused interviews, but said on July 18 she is "committed to keeping the lines of communication open."

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