Gay Issues
Gay Issues

Obama Buys Gays' Lies About Hospital Visitation

| by FRC

To hear homosexual activists talk, you'd think that hospitals are surrounded by airport-level security and require four forms of ID (driver's license, birth certificate, marriage certificate, and genealogy) before you can get in to visit a patient. Pastors and others who visit the sick on a regular basis can tell you--that's simply not true. In fact, in my church leadership capacity I have been going to hospitals for years and have never been prevented from visiting. The claim that homosexuals are routinely denied the right to visit their partners in the hospital has only one source--homosexual activists who use it as an argument for redefining marriage. President Obama's "memorandum" last night ordering hospitals to change their visitation policies is a solution in search of a problem--but also one that panders to a special interest group seeking to redefine marriage.

Let me be clear--I agree that patients should be free to authorize anyone they want to visit them in the hospital and make decisions for them if they are unable to. In fact, they can already do so--through advance directives, such as a health care proxy or power of attorney. These are private contractual arrangements that do not require redefining "family" or "marriage." And they don't require the President of the United States to make himself "hospital-administrator-in-chief."

To hear homosexual activists talk, you'd think that hospitals are surrounded by airport-level security and require four forms of ID (driver's license, birth certificate, marriage certificate, and genealogy) before you can get in to visit a patient. Pastors and others who visit the sick on a regular basis can tell you--that's simply not true. In fact, in my church leadership capacity I have been going to hospitals for years and have never been prevented from visiting. The claim that homosexuals are routinely denied the right to visit their partners in the hospital has only one source--homosexual activists who use it as an argument for redefining marriage. President Obama's "memorandum" last week ordering hospitals to change their visitation policies is a solution in search of a problem--but also one that panders to a special interest group seeking to redefine marriage.

Let me be clear--I agree that patients should be free to authorize anyone they want to visit them in the hospital and make decisions for them if they are unable to. In fact, they can already do so--through advance directives, such as a health care proxy or power of attorney. These are private contractual arrangements that do not require redefining "family" or "marriage." And they don't require the President of the United States to make himself "hospital-administrator-in-chief."