A lawsuit filed in California Superior Court against televangelism network Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN) alleges misconduct and criminal activity in the ministry, implicating founders/hosts Paul and Jan Crouch (pictured left), and their son Matt.

The lawsuit was filed by Paul Crouch’s granddaughter Brittany Koper (and her husband), a former executive at TBN, who was fired after she blew the whistle on alleged fraudulent and criminal activities.

When Koper refused to play along, she allegedly faced threats of “physical and lethal violence” by Matt Crouch, and she was reportedly told by Paul Crouch that Jan and Matt “want your heads."

The Los Angeles Times reports:

The lawsuit alleges that Paul Crouch Sr. obtained a $50-million Global Express luxury jet for his personal use through a "sham loan," and that TBN funds paid for a $100,000 motor home for dogs owned by his wife, Janice Crouch, a network director.

The suit also alleges that TBN bought residences across the country for its directors under the pretext that they were "guest homes" or "church parsonages." The properties include mansions used by the Crouch family in Newport Beach; side-by-side mansions in Windermere, Fla.; and homes in Nashville; Miami; and Irving, Texas, according to the suit.

Additionally, a section the lawsuit accuses TBN of covering up a “bloody sexual assault,” sexual infidelities by Paul and Jan Crouch, and repeated incidents in which Matt Crouch exposed his genitals to staff.

TBN issued a press release this morning in response: "The soundness and veracity of these stories are completely undermined when you realize that they depend almost exclusively upon accusations from individuals who admitted they had embezzled and misappropriated over $1 million from the network, and its companion ministry, International Christian Broadcasting."

"What the bulk of media stories don't explain is that these individuals used lawsuits to contrive absurd allegations that trusted TBN officials had illegally funneled millions of dollars for their own use. Add to that the fabrications that Dr. and Mrs. Crouch were using ministry funds to buy jewelry, jets, mansions, and mobile homes for dogs, and you have all the ammunition for a stereotypical attack against an esteemed media ministry."