Politics
Politics

Only Four People Attend Rick Santorum Campaign Event In Rural Iowa

| by Ethan Brown

While visiting the small town of Hamlin, Iowa, on June 8, Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum was joined for lunch by just one supporter, a county official associated with the Republican Party.

The one attendee, Peggy Toft, is the chair of the county’s Republican Party and an insurance agent. Santorum and Toft had lunch together after the former Pennsylvania Senator and 2012 presidential candidate commented, “I haven’t eaten, actually, all day,” The Des Moines Register noted.

Santorum was not surprised by the low turnout and considered the campaign stop a success, comparing Monday’s turnout to the same kind of events he held during his first presidential campaign four years ago.

During his first run for the presidency, Santorum visited all of Iowa’s counties, 99 in total, discussing issues in low populated areas, such as Hamlin. The township of Hamlin has only 300 residents. He would later defeat eventual Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney in the state’s all-important caucus, bucking the trend of the Iowa caucus choosing the GOP’s nominee.

“It’s not glamourous, and you’re not out there raising money, but you’re doing what the money is ultimately supposed to do – getting votes,” Santorum said. “This is a lot more fun than being on the phone raising money.”

Santorum’s midday campaign stop was also to blame for the low turnout.

After he sat down to lunch, three more supporters eventually made their way to Santorum’s area. He was asked about his views on same-sex marriage by local minister Glen Meyers.

“This is where the left is saying ‘Here is what your belief system should be, and anyone who does not toe the line, you’re a hater, you’re a bigot, you’re intolerant and you will not be tolerated,'” Santorum responded.

Later in the day, Santorum stopped in Carroll, Iowa, where he was greeted by three paid staffers on his campaign, two Democratic campaign reporters, a CNN reporter, and a waitress working at a small restaurant, CNN reported. Santorum remained optimistic about the low turnout at this location.

“The key in those smaller counties is to find one or two really good volunteers. (Then they) tell everybody in the county that you came, and that you were available to speak to them and you sat for an hour and listened to the concerns of the people from that country,” Santorum told the CNN reporter.

Sources: The Des Moines Register, CNN

Photo Credit: Austen Hufford/Flickr, Gage Skidmore/Flickr