In the weeks since George Zimmerman’s killing of Trayvon Martin, corporate America has been force fed a crash survey of public opinion on gun policy.

Some of America’s most popular—and message-savvy—companies announced their swift verdict when they, and then the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), withdrew support for the National Rifle Association’s paranoid, violent agenda.

ALEC’s abrupt abandonment of the conservative agenda’s gun plank wasn’t caused by sympathy for Trayvon or the 32 murdered by gunfire each day in America. ALEC’s corporate sponsors are a bottom line bunch, and for years were happy to push for NRA laws to force guns on college campuses, deprive cities of the authority to regulate guns, and, most notably, “Stand Your Ground” or “Shoot First, Ask Questions Later” laws that embolden and immunize killers.

Under the spotlight of America’s scrutiny, so glaring was the culpability of ALEC in implementing the gun lobby’s dark vision, that Coke and Pepsi, McDonald’s and Wendy’s, Kraft and Mars, Blue Cross and Bill Gates all reached the same conclusion: association with the NRA’s extremist agenda was toxic.

The message from ALEC’s decision is clear. When exposed to the light, the NRA's agenda becomes toxic. And Americans want nothing to do with those who conspire to bring about the gun lobby’s dangerous “guns everywhere” vision.