Drug Law
Drug Law

Denver Restricts Medical Marijuana Gardens

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The Denver City Council on Monday, passed an ordinance limiting the number of medical marijuana plants that can be grown in a residence to six per patient, with a limit of 12 per residence. It also allows only patients, not caregivers, to grow medical marijuana in their residences. The council voted on the new restrictions with a 12-1 vote.

 

The council says the new limits are needed to protect residential areas. Councilwoman Jeanne Robb said she made a motion for the restrictions after a constituent living in Congress Park complained of a neighbor who had more than 60 medical marijuana plants. That constituent, 31 year-old Ed Thompson told the council that he tried without success to get his neighbor to stop a large-scale marijuana grow operation after his son was born earlier this year. The complainant said his neighbor’s residence attracts a steady stream of visitors. The city cited the neighbor after he admitted to selling some of his medical marijuana to commercial medical marijuana dispensaries. Thompson told the city council in their meeting, “”I could smell the marijuana even when I was in my own home with the windows closed,”

Violations of the brand new ordinance that went into effect immediately are a $150 fine on the first offense, a $500 fine for the second offense and a $999 fine on the third offense. Jacob Browne, the general manager of a medical marijuana dispensary told council members that their vote directly affects the sick. Doug Linkhart, the lone dissenting vote on the issue said he objected to the new rule because of caregivers no longer being allowed to grow medical marijuana in Denver. He said the restrictions would end up funneling more patients to commercial dispensaries and harm those who can’t afford to buy from them. Most council members said that the new rules have struck the best balance between patients and homeowners. The council did agree that the new restrictions would expire after two years so city officials would have time to see whether they are working.

The Denver City Council on Monday, passed an ordinance limiting the number of medical marijuana plants that can be grown in a residence to six per patient, with a limit of 12 per residence. It also allows only patients, not caregivers, to grow medical marijuana in their residences. The council voted on the new restrictions with a 12-1 vote.

The council says the new limits are needed to protect residential areas. Councilwoman Jeanne Robb said she made a motion for the restrictions after a constituent living in Congress Park complained of a neighbor who had more than 60 medical marijuana plants. That constituent, 31 year-old Ed Thompson told the council that he tried without success to get his neighbor to stop a large-scale marijuana grow operation after his son was born earlier this year. The complainant said his neighbor’s residence attracts a steady stream of visitors. The city cited the neighbor after he admitted to selling some of his medical marijuana to commercial medical marijuana dispensaries. Thompson told the city council in their meeting, “”I could smell the marijuana even when I was in my own home with the windows closed,”

Violations of the brand new ordinance that went into effect immediately are a $150 fine on the first offense, a $500 fine for the second offense and a $999 fine on the third offense. Jacob Browne, the general manager of a medical marijuana dispensary told council members that their vote directly affects the sick. Doug Linkhart, the lone dissenting vote on the issue said he objected to the new rule because of caregivers no longer being allowed to grow medical marijuana in Denver. He said the restrictions would end up funneling more patients to commercial dispensaries and harm those who can’t afford to buy from them. Most council members said that the new rules have struck the best balance between patients and homeowners. The council did agree that the new restrictions would expire after two years so city officials would have time to see whether they are working.