Teacher Says Student Is Too Busty (Photo)

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A Missouri high school student was reportedly told by her teacher that she's "too busty."

The incident allegedly happened on Sept. 8 and involved Kelsey Anderson, 17, at Joplin High School, reports KOVR.

Kelsey's mother, Melissa Barber, posted a photo on Facebook of the teen's controversial attire, which consisted of jeans and a long-sleeved shirt with a laced-up V-neck.

The accompanying caption described the ordeal in detail:

I received a call from the school about my daughter being sent to the office for a dress code violation. I was told that the teacher was being unreasonable and obviously made a mistake. My daughter was speaking to the counselor and I was asked to attend a meeting with her and the principal. (A different principal than the one I had just spoken with.) She was sent to the office by her [Child Development] teacher Mrs. Morris. When my daughter asked why she was being sent to the office, this teacher told her "bustier women need to wear clothing that cover their cleavage." Then followed it up by saying "Plus size women need to dress accordingly". My daughter has just been called "Busty" and "Plus Size" in front of the entire class … Seems like another way to keep girls uneducated.

Kelsey spoke through a statement issued by her attorney, Elizabeth Turner. "I was mortified by my teacher, of all people, saying something like this in front of my class. When I was pulled into a meeting with the Principal, he told me that he had never heard of me being victimized before and he didn't really believe what I said."

In response, the Joplin School District said that staff comments about the bodies of students is inappropriate, and that it is investigating whether there was a violation of the policy requiring staff to "maintain courteous and professional relationships with students."

In her statement, Turner aid that "body shaming isn't something to take lightly," noting that the suicide rate among teenage girls is on the rise.

"It is sad that in this day and age, when we teach children and young adults about the dangers of bullying and body shaming with laws to protect against bullying, that we have to worry about the adults in our children's lives being the ones to hurt them," she added.

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Among young people, low self-esteem due to body image can have a wide range of negative effects, notes the website Family Doctor. It can make it difficult for them to form friendships, make them reluctant to seek higher education, and lead to depression and other health issues.

Sources: KOVR, Melissa Barber/Facebook, Family Doctor / Featured Image: Pixabay / Embedded Images: Facebook via KOVR, Max Pixel

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