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Man Learns 'Pregnant Fiance' Actually Male Scam Artist

| by Sheena Vasani
figures on a wedding cakefigures on a wedding cake

A man in China reportedly dated and pretended to be another man’s pregnant bride before running away with his money.

The groom, known only by his last name, Wang, initially met what later turned out to be 27-year-old scam artist Miao Songtao through a dating site, WorldWideWeirdNews.com reports.

Songtao posed as a woman, and before long, they were dating.

Wang proposed to his "girlfriend" after Songtao revealed she was pregnant.

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The had a large wedding, but just three days after they married, Wang’s partner reportedly disappeared with all of his valuables and wedding gifts.

At the same time, another man filed a police report saying a girl he had met online stole a lot of his money.

With this information, authorities lured Songtao to an internet cafe where his true identity was revealed.

Police revealed the information to Wang, who now was forced to accept that his pregnant girlfriend was actually a man and a thief all along.

An investigation of the scam artist’s home revealed the man’s wigs, high heels and even sexy underwear. Police also learned that Songtao had dated a total of 11 men in 2016, stealing thousands off of them.

The scam artist explained to police that he "was not sure if he liked men or women, but was quite fond of money," WorldWideWeirdNews.com notes.

This is not the first wedding scam to capture international attention.

In September 2015, authorities arrested a Chinese father-daughter team charged with arranging a myriad of fake weddings to help people immigrate to the U.S., the Los Angeles Times reported.

Jason Shiao, 65, and Lynn Leung, 43, were charged with handling more than 70 fake cases in the past 10 years, reportedly earning as much as $50,000 per client.

“They had this phony law firm and this actual office,” said Claude Arnold, who works in the investigative division of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, according to the Los Angeles Times.

"Because of that professional face on their organization, they were able to charge more."

The duo would allegedly concoct elaborate schemes to remain undetected, including helping set up fake Las Vegas honeymoons and more.

Sources: WorldWideWeirdNews.com, Los Angeles Times / Photo Credit: Andy Mabbet via Wikimedia Commons

 

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