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Socialism Is At Fault For Venezuela's Turmoil

| by Shani Shahmoon

Venezuela is out of toilet paper and socialism is to blame.

Suffering from economic turmoil, violence, and medical coverage issues, the last thing Venezuelans need is a life without toilet paper.

In 1998, Hugo Chavez ran for president in Venezuela, touting Bolivarian socialistic ideals, and won. Since then, the country has been sinking in the socialism boat, and it is about time someone call out the impracticality of the system in place, The Telegraph reported.

Chavez reran for president in 2013 and won, but died shortly after from cancer, leaving his vice president, Nicolas Maduro, in office. He has been there since.

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Under the Chavez regime, Venezuela's debt quintupled, over 1,150 companies were nationalized, and human rights were thrown out the window as he removed the country from the American Convention on Human Rights (because while everyone should be granted rights to housing, education and health care, freedom of expression is a bit too risky, I guess).

Maduro picked up right where Chavez left off -- promoting these unrealistic socialist ideals that have left his citizens in complete unrest.

Bloomberg reported that eight out of every 10 Venezuelans disapprove of the current government, and 63 percent say they want Maduro out of office.

This is probably because of how far the country's leadership is willing to go to support their socialistic values, regardless of the outcome.

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In terms of its economy, Venezuela's gross domestic product shrank by 10 percent in 2016, and is expected to get even worse in 2017. And with inflation on oil prices (as Venezuela happens to sit upon the largest oil reserve ever reported) and hard currency reserves, the government is lacking in tangible money to import basic goods.

With the government lacking in money, that means they are also experiencing a lack of food and medicine.

In 2016, the average Venezuelan lost 19 pounds due to lack of food. All the while, eight in 10 medicines are not available for purchase since they are not being imported.

Sick, hungry and tired, Venezuelans have begun to take their discontentment to the streets. Some of this is shown in crime, seeing as the murder rate has climbed and is now 80 times more than London's. On the other hand, protests have started to pick up, and Maduro's government has resorted to violent measures.

As of May 1, 29 people have been killed, more than 1,300 have been arbitrarily detained, and many more have been injured.

So you have no food, no proper medicine for your universal health care, no toilet paper, high murder rates and your government is starting to act like a dictatorship in response to protests; what do you do?

Leave.

In America alone, the number of Venezuelans applying for refuge has increased by 168 percent. Surrounding countries are facing similar increases of Venezuelan immigrants.

We saw this happen in Russia and in China, and now Venezuela is starting to show the same exact symptoms.

Sounds like a bad case of socialism. 

Click here for the opposing view on this topic

Sources: The Telegraph, Bloomberg (2) / Photo credit: Diariocritico de Venezuela/ Flickr

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