World

Soccer Fans Attack Referees On Field (Video)

| by Michael Allen

Fans stormed a soccer field in Argentina during a match between Sarmiento and Sansineta on Dec. 4 (video below).

Ayacucho Al Dia, a news site in Argentina, reports that the fans got angry after the referees did not call a penalty on a player for Sansineta, and the team went on to score.

The scuffle started when some Sarmiento players pushed one of the refs, notes Mediaite.com.

Apparently, that encouraged the many of the fans to run on the field and attack the referees.

Popular Video

This young teenage singer was shocked when Keith Urban invited her on stage at his concert. A few moments later, he made her wildest dreams come true.

The refs were eventually escorted to a locker room where they tended to their wounds (video below).

This is not the first time violence has struck during a game in Argentina.

A referee, Cesar Flores, was shot and killed by a soccer player whom he penalized back in February, noted USA TODAY.

"It all happened during the [soccer] match," a police source told the Efe news agency at the time. "We don’t know [exactly what took place], but it appears the player was angry, fetched a gun and killed him."

Popular Video

This young teenage singer was shocked when Keith Urban invited her on stage at his concert. A few moments later, he made her wildest dreams come true:

There was a reported manhunt for the unidentified assailant/player.

Hooligan soccer fans, who arm themselves with guns, knives and fisticuffs, have been a chronic problem in Argentina, the New York Times reported in 2011.

Let’s Save Football, a group that is trying to rid the sport of the violent fans, said there have been 257 soccer-related deaths in Argentina since 1924. Of that number, about half have happened in the past two decades. These thug fans often have connections who keep them out of jail.

"On Sundays they go to the stadium and wave the flag of the club to support the team," Gustavo Gerlero, a prosecutor, told the newspaper. "During the week they are giving support to politicians and union leaders as laborers and bodyguards by the very people that theoretically should be stopping them."

The hooligan soccer fan clubs usually have a few hundred members who sing songs and wave banners inside the stadium. But the same fans can be found outside the stadium selling illegal drugs and re-selling tickets for high prices.

Sources: Mediaite.com, USA TODAY, The New York Times / Photo Credit: Interior Futbolero TV/YouTube

Should soccer games be stopped in Argentina?
Yes - 0%
Yes - 0%