Saudi Arabia Begins Construction On 600-Mile-Long 'Great Wall' Along Iraqi Border

| by Tony Tran
Diagram of Saudi border fenceDiagram of Saudi border fence

Amidst the chaos and turmoil in the Middle East, Saudi Arabia finds an unlikely solution to terrorists by taking a lesson from the Middle Ages.

The next time jihadists decide to attack Saudi Arabia, they might just find that the country is a lot harder to infiltrate now.

The Saudis plan to construct a 600-mile-long “Great Wall” along the country’s northern border with Iraq. The barrier combines both fence and ditch to separate the two neighboring countries, The Telegraph reported.

Although discussions of building a wall began in 2006, the height of the Iraqi Civil War, construction began in September in a response to the Islamic terrorist group ISIL, which regards the capture of the “Two Holy Mosques” of Medina and Mecca -- both of which are located in Saudi Arabia -- as their ultimate goal, the newspaper reported.

The heightened security measures include five layers of fencing along with watchtowers, and night vision and radar vision cameras.

Response to the wall’s construction have ranged from optimistic to highly critical. Many say the wall harkens back to the one from Ancient China, though this might be a bad thing as twitterer Haykal Bafana points out: “Great Wall of China? Yes, the one that failed to stop the Mongols? Well, Saudi Arabia is building one to keep out IS.”

Though the wall may deter some would be terrorists from entering the Kingdom, there are those who are still willing to put it all on the line to send a message to Saudi Arabia.

In an attempt to disrupt construction on the wall, four militants attacked a post along the border last week killing three guards including a Saudi general. The attack happened 25 miles from the town of Arar, at the Suweif border, near the Iraqi province of Anbar. 

All four attackers -- including a suicide bomber -- were killed.

Source: The UK Telegraph, Global Voices Online

Photo Credit: The UK Telegraph, Wikipedia