Report: Number Of Homeless Families Is Skyrocketing In England

| by Michael Allen

Homelessness in England is reportedly the worst it has been since 2008.

According to numbers from the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) in the UK, about 65,000 households are living in temporary housing.

The housing includes mobile homes and single room annexes that are built on to the back of bed and breakfasts, noted The Independent.

Homeless advocates put the blame on high rental costs and welfare cuts for the poor. More cuts are coming from the conservative government led by Prime Minister David Cameron.

From January to April of this year, 13,520 families became homeless in England, notes

Blacks and other minorities people make up 55 percent of those living in temporary places, while 44 percent are single moms and couples with dependent kids come in at 24 percent.

About 100,000 children are reportedly living in hostels.

Jon Sparkes, who heads the homeless advocacy group Crisis, stated on the organization's website:

England is sleepwalking into a homelessness crisis, and we’ve yet to hear what our new Government intends to do about it. Local authorities are in an impossible situation.

We need decisive political action to fix our broken private rented sector, along with radical solutions to tackle the severe shortage of affordable homes.

At the same time, we must have a safety net that genuinely protects tenants struggling to make ends meet.

According to The Independent, a spokesman for the DCLG said:

This Government is making sure that action is being taken to ensure that all homeless people have access to the help they need to get back on their feet. 

Since 2010, we have increased spending to prevent homelessness, making over £500 million [about $787,000,000] available to local authorities and voluntary sector to support the most vulnerable in society and put strong protections in place to guard people against the threat of homelessness.

This is to ensure there is no return to the days 10 years ago, when homelessness in England was nearly double what it is today.

Sources:, Crisis, The Independent
Image Credit: Dr. Neil Clifton