World

RAF Writes 'Love From Manchester' On ISIS Missile (Photo)

| by Sheena Vasani

The British Royal Air Force captured international attention when it wrote an interesting message on a Hellfire missile intended for Syrian ISIS targets.

"Love from Manchester," reads the defiant note a secret Middle East-based drone squadron thought up, reports the Daily Mail.

The note was written in response to the Manchester terrorist attack that killed nearly two dozen people on May 22.

Popular Video

This young teenage singer was shocked when Keith Urban invited her on stage at his concert. A few moments later, he made her wildest dreams come true.

"The sentiment of the message is understandable under the circumstances," an unidentified source explained. "There's a history of messages being written on missiles in the RAF. It's unlikely the individual responsible for it will be disciplined."

The note was met with mixed responses on social media.

Some applauded the sentiment.

"This pleases me so much," wrote one Daily Mail reader. "Get them and get them good. They believe in an eye for an eye so let them have it."

Popular Video

This young teenage singer was shocked when Keith Urban invited her on stage at his concert. A few moments later, he made her wildest dreams come true:

"This has made me smile, well done lads and get a few more lined up to say welcome to hell!" added one Manchester resident.

"That's the proper response," said another. "Maybe that missile will find some of them before they 'return' to the UK. Plastic crosses, candles, hashtags and teddy bears have no effect."

Others thought both the note and bomb should not be sent.

"Anyone who thinks bombing ISIL in Syria makes us safer here are seriously deluded," argued one person. "It just makes it easier to recruit here. This war is really being fought here at home and on the internet."

"If they can guarantee that the missiles will only hit ISIS members for example if they have a camp in the middle of nowhere etc then great good on them," chimed in a second on the Daily Mail's Facebook page. "BUT if it's likely going to hit innocent people then I don't agree because that would make us as bad as them."

"No doubt create some more terrorists," said another. "You have seen first hand the grief a home made bomb causes...so what do you think this is going to do to other innocent families…"

It's not the first time armed forces have written a defiant note on a missile. Such messages have been inscribed on bombs since World War I and have become a tradition.

After the November 2015 terrorists attacks in Paris, American bombs and missiles aimed at ISIS strongholds had notes saying, "From Paris, With Love." Russian forces also wrote "For Paris" on on their bombs.

Sources: Daily Mail, Daily Mail/Facebook / Photo credit: TSGT Scott Reed/U.S. Air Force/Wikimedia Commons, The White Debo/Twitter via Daily Mail

Is the message inappropriate?
Yes - 0%
Yes - 0%