Husband Tries To Set Wife On Fire, Kills Self Instead

| by David Bonner
A window of the burnt out asylum houseA window of the burnt out asylum house

Germany has accepted over a million refugees from the war-torn Middle East, primarily from Iraq and Syria.

One of the refugees, a 45-year-old man, tried to kill his wife by setting her on fire, but ended up killing himself instead, reports the Daily Mail.

The attack took place at the asylum house in Ruedesheim, where the wife lived with their three children and many other residents. The husband was housed separately due to previous unspecified incidents, according to the Hesse state police.

In the process of trying to burn his wife alive, the husband inhaled a blast of flames, inflicting fatal damage to his lungs. His wife, 31, received life-threatening burns and is being treated at a specialist facility in Mainz, the state police confirm.

The asylum home was rendered uninhabitable in the process, and the remaining residents have been required to move out.

The situation in Syria which the refugees are fleeing is been described as follows by Human Rights Watch:

Violence in Syria has escalated amid an absence of meaningful efforts to end the war. The government and its allies carried out deliberate and indiscriminate attacks on civilians. Incommunicado detention and torture remain rampant. Armed groups opposing the government have attacked civilians, used child soldiers, kidnapped, and tortured. The extremist group Islamic State (also known as ISIS), and Al-Qaeda’s affiliate in Syria, Jabhat al-Nusra, were responsible targeting civilians, kidnappings, and executions. According to local Syrian groups, as of October 2015, the conflict’s death toll topped 250,000 people, including more than 100,000 civilians. About 7.6 million people are internally displaced, with 4.2 million refugees in neighboring countries.

The fighting in the Syrian city of Aleppo, in particular, has been one of the bloodiest and most tragic urban conflicts of modern times, according to Peter Maurer of the International Red Cross. “No one and nowhere is safe,” he explains. “Shellfire is constant, with houses, schools and hospitals all in the line of fire. The scale of the suffering is immense.”

Sources: Daily Mail, Human Rights Watch / Photo credit: EPA via Daily Mail

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