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ISIS Pushes Birth Control For Sex Slaves

| by Sean Kelly
yazidi womenyazidi women

According to reports, ISIS is pushing birth control onto women to maintain a supply of sex slaves.

A 16-year-old girl told The New York Times that for the year she was held captive by ISIS in Iraq, she was continually raped by militants who would force feed her contraceptive pills to ensure she didn't become pregnant.

"Every day, I had to swallow one in front of him," the girl said. "He gave me one box per month. When I ran out, he replaced it. When I was sold from one man to another, the box of pills came with me.

The girl told The New York Times that she was constantly worried about becoming pregnant by one of her rapists, and only learned months later that she'd been given birth control the entire time.

ISIS leaders embraced sexual slavery because they believe it was practiced during the time of the Prophet Muhammad. More than three dozen Yazidi women recently escaped from ISIS captivity and spoke about their experiences. Some were driven to a hospital to be tested for the hCG hormone, The New York Times reports.

An 18-year-old former captive, who identified herself as J., said she was sold to the governor of ISIS' city of Tal Afar.

"Each month, he made me get a shot," she said. "It was his assistant who took me to the hospital. On top of that he also gave me birth control pills. He told me, ‘We don’t want you to get pregnant.'"

She was then sold to a Syrian fighter, whose mother escorted her to the hospital to be tested.

"She told me, ‘If you are pregnant, we are going to send you back,’” J. said. "They took me into the lab. There were machines that looked like centrifuges and other contraptions. They drew three vials of my blood. About 30 or 40 minutes later, they came back to say I wasn’t pregnant.”

The revelation of sexual slavery is just one of many recent developments in the continuing reign of ISIS. The organization recently launched a chemical attack in Iraq that killed a toddler and wounded 600 others.

Sources: New York Times, CBS News / Photo credit: Daily Mail

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