British Sniper Beheads ISIS Commander Teaching Class On Decapitation

| by Reve Fisher
ISIS recruitsISIS recruits

In an unexpected twist of events for the Islamic State, a sniper blew the head off an ISIS commander during a class in which the instructor was teaching recruits how to behead prisoners.

The sniper, who is surviving as a member of the British Special Air Service (SAS), used a high-powered rifle to decapitate the fearsome commander from more than 3,000 feet away in northern Syria.

According to The Daily Express, the sniper needed to adjust for wind conditions, but hit his target on the first attempt. About a dozen SAS soldiers assisted in the operation after successfully sneaking into a jihadi compound.

“One minute he was standing there and the next his head had exploded,” a military insider recalled, as reported by The Daily Express. “The commander remained standing upright for a couple of seconds before collapsing and that’s when panic set in."

Approximately 20 recruits were attending the outdoor lesson when the ISIS commander was killed.

“We later heard most of the recruits deserted,” the military official continued. “We got rid of 21 terrorists with one bullet.”

The sniper allegedly used an Israeli-made Dan .338 bolt-action rifle with a noise suppressor for the attack. According to The Daily Caller, the rifle features a .338 LAPUA Magnum bullet that rotates once it reaches its target, causing a large hole and displacing the liquid throughout the body in a process called “hydrostatic shock”

British troops have been reportedly operating in Syria since November 2015, and the British SAS is the most secretive and elite combat force in the United Kingdom. United States Secretary of Defense Ash Carter stated, before the House Armed Services Committee, that U.S. special operations forces would be participating in unilateral operations against ISIS in Syria.

According to The International Business Times, British soldiers are preparing to join a multi-national task force against IS in Libya. Although plans to send armed forces to North Africa have been established, the coalition, led by the United States, must wait until Libya establishes a new parliament that will allow western forces to attack the jihadists close to the Sitre stronghold.

Sources: The Daily Express, The Daily Caller, The International Business Times / Photo Credit: The Daily Express

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