World

30,000-Troop Operation In Iraq's Tikrit Reportedly Takes Out ISIS Second-In-Command

| by Dominic Kelly
article imagearticle image

The Iraqi military is reportedly following through with a 30,000-troop mission to take back the city of Tikrit from ISIS members, and in the process, it has allegedly already killed ISIS’s second-in-command.

The Daily Mail reports that the Iraqi military sent 30,000 troops to Tikrit to force ISIS members out of the city, and so far, it seems to be working. Reports say that members of the terrorist group are already starting to abandon their posts in the city, and thousands of soldiers are even claiming to have taken out ISIS’s second-in-command.

Despite progress in the area, the Daily Mail says that roadside bombs are slowing down the Iraqi military’s huge operation.

“The anti-ISIS advance has been slowed by numerous roadside bombs however, leading to fierce clashes outside the town of al-Dour, south of Tikrit,” the Daily Mail reports. “Retaking the ISIS stronghold is considered vital if government forces are to succeed in their plan to force ISIS out of the oil rich city of Mosul, the terror group's Iraqi power base which lies just 140 miles north of Tikrit on Highway 1 - a road that effectively marks the front line in northern Iraq.”

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

Iraq’s prime minister Haider al-Abadi spoke on Sunday of the military’s plan to send 30,000 troops to Tikrit to take back the city, which is the birthplace of former dictator Saddam Hussein. In his address to the nation, al-Abadi reportedly urged soldiers and Shi’ite militias to save civilians during the attacks.

“The priority we gave to the armed forces and all the forces taking part alongside them,” Prime Minister al-Abadi reiterated in his address, “is to preserve the security of citizens.”

The killing of ISIS's second-in-command has yet to be officially confirmed. 

Source: Daily Mail, Newsweek / Photo Source: Daily Mail