World

German Hunter Shoots, Kills One Of The Biggest Elephants Ever Seen In Zimbabwe (Photos)

| by Amanda Andrade-Rhoades
the hunter and the elephantthe hunter and the elephant

 An unidentified German hunter has reportedly shot and killed a 40- to 60-year-old elephant in Zimbabwe’s southern Gonarezhou National Park. The man reportedly paid $60,000 to shoot the elephant on Oct. 8 (photos below).

The elephant’s tusks weighed in at a combined 120 lbs. and some speculated that it could be the largest elephant killed in Africa in nearly 30 years, Telegraph reported. The company that organized the hunt has refused to name the German national, but the International Business Times reported that the group was seeking elephants, leopards, lions, buffalo, and rhinoceroses.

"This was a legal hunt and the client did nothing wrong," an unnamed man who helped organize the 21-day trip told the Telegraph. "We hunters have thick skins and we know what the greenies will say. This elephant was probably 60 years old and had spread its seed many many times over.”

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Anthony Kaschula, who operates a photographic safari firm in the area, posted pictures of the hunt on Facebook.

“We have no control over poaching but we do have control over hunting policy that should acknowledge that animals such as this one are of far more value alive (to both hunters and non-hunters) than dead,” he wrote alongside the picture.

“Individual elephants such as these should be accorded their true value as a National Heritage and should be off limits to hunting," he added. "In this case, we have collectively failed to ensure that legislation is not in place to help safeguard such magnificent animals.”

Sources: Telegraph, International Business Times / Photo Credit: Telegraph, Facebook: Game Animals of the Past and Present via IBTimes