World

French Kids Can Sue Over Parents' Facebook Pics

| by Zara Zhi

French parents who post images of their children on social media without permission could face legal action.

Under France's strict privacy laws, parents could be jailed for up to a year or fined up to $48,863 if found guilty of uploading private information about others -- including their own children -- without permission, International Business Times (IBT) reports.

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“Children at certain stages do not wish to be photographed or still less for those photos to be made public," Viviane Gelles, a lawyer specializing in internet-related issues, told Le Figaro, according to IBT.

Furthermore, adults who litigate against parents for impeding on their right to privacy while they were minors could receive compensation, according to experts.

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"Posting photos of your children on Facebook is not without danger ... Protect your children!" read a warning on the Gendarmerie Facebook page in February.

French police have also been cautioning parents about the dangers of posting naked pictures of their children online due to the threat of being targeted by pedophiles.

Social media giant Facebook is known for having spats with European lawmakers over privacy issues. In February, a Paris appeals court passed a verdict that Facebook could be sued in France over its suspension of an account, reports Fortune.

The court ruled in favor of art expert Jean-Jacques Fernier, allowing him to sue Facebook for suspending his account five years ago without prior notice. This suspension came after Fernier reportedly posted an illicit painting on the social media site.

Facebook lost another battle in Belgian courts in 2015 over a lawsuit regarding its tracking of non-users; the company was ordered to cease-and-desist.

In 2014, Google lost a battle with the European Court of Justice because they refused to comply with the “right to be forgotten” law. The ruling was significant because it established that foreign courts had dominion over a giant tech juggernaut like Google even though the company is based in the U.S.

Sources: IBT, Fortune / Photo credit: TechCrunch, Franco Bouly/Flickr

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