World

Canadian Researchers: 'Transabled' People Intentionally Become Disabled

| by Michael Allen

"Transabled" people are folks who intentionally try to become disabled through arranged "accidents."

Clive Baldwin, who teaches at St. Thomas University in Fredericton, New Brunswick in Canada, has interviewed 37 "transable" people whom he describes as mostly male and living in Germany, Switzerland and Canada, noted the National Post.

Baldwin sees some parallels between transabled and transgender people who do not feel their bodies accurately reflect who they are inside.

Alexandre Baril, a visiting scholar at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, claims that transabled people are not easily accepted by those who are transgender or disabled.

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“They tend to see transabled people as dishonest people, people who try to steal resources from the community, people who would be disrespectful by denying or fetishizing or romanticizing disability reality,” Baril stated.

A man who refers to himself as "One Hand Jason" told BME.com in 2008 how he staged an accident to cut off his right arm:

I don’t want to be hugely specific, but I used a very sharp power tool, after having tried out different methods of crushing and cutting. I know first aid so I was able to stop the bleeding with pressure, but I was worried that I could pass out and not call for help and lose too much blood. No worries, though, I guess I’m in good enough shape that I didn’t even feel dizzy.

My goal was to get the job done with no hope of reconstruction or re-attachment, and I wanted some method that I could actually bring myself to do. I did experiments with animal legs I got from a butcher. It’s lucky I thought of that, because some of my early attempts were total fuck ups and would have ended up with a damaged hand which might have had to undergo years of painful reconstruction, and worse yet, no amputation.

Sources: National Post, BME.com
Image Credit: Renaud Bardez