Society

How Do You Define Feminism?

| by Jill Stanek

I saw a cover story about "Saint Sarah" by religion editor Lisa Miller (who 3 weeks ago called the excommunication and reassignment of a Catholic nun for authorizing an abortion in a Catholic hospital Harvard professor R. Marie Griffith, author of the book, God's Daughters: Evangelical Women and the Power of Submission, in Miller's piece: "You hate to say it, but mainstream feminism has had an antireligious bias for a really long time."

In Miller's piece the word "submission" and "submissive" both came up twice as part of the mix. In general I found her article offensive and misunderstanding the pro-life female conservative culture. (Cecile Richards retweeted the piece, which indicates liberal pro-aborts must have loved it.) Here was Miller's definition of Palin's brand of feminism:

"Within these circles, there is very much an ideal Christian woman model," explains Griffith. "It's an image that blends this kind of submissive, pretty, aw-shucks demeanor with a fiery power, a spiritual warfare." Palin may say she's a pugnacious jock primed to take on the big boys, but her family, beauty-queen figure, and glossy hair are her calling cards.

So there's their definition of of the conservative definition of feminism.

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

But what is your definition? And under those terms, would you consider yourself a feminist?