Gay Issues

50 Cent's Feud With Perez Hilton Extends to Entire Gay Community

| by GLAAD

Rapper 50 Cent made a joke about violence against gays in his Twitter feed yesterday, in response to an insult made by Perez Hilton.

As reported by AfterElton and Queerty, after Hilton referred to him as a “douchebag,” 50 Cent responded on Twitter, saying:

“Perez Hilton calld me douchebag so I had my homie shoot up a gay wedding.  wasnt his but still made me feel better. “

The tweet was accompanied by a photo of two men in suits running from an angry mob.

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Screen capture of 50 Cent's anti-gay tweet

Instead of keeping his dispute with Perez Hilton “mano a mano,” rapper 50 Cent decided to take his frustration with the blogger out on all gay people.

GLAAD calls on 50 Cent to let his fans know that anti-gay violence isn’t something to joke about.

On Twitter? Please post this tweet to your twitter page to let 50 Cent know your thoughts:

RT @glaad: Tell @50cent to let his fans know that anti-gay violence isn’t something to joke about. http://bit.ly/ab6rXV Pls RT! #LGBT #gay

This isn’t the first time 50 Cent has made remarks that have offended the LGBT community.  In a 2004 interview with Playboy magazine, the rapper said:

“I don’t like gay people around me, because I’m not comfortable with what their thoughts are. I’m not prejudiced. I just don’t go with gay people and kick it — we don’t have that much in common. I’d rather hang out with a straight dude. But women who like women, that’s cool.”

50 Cent also revealed his mother had been bisexual in the same interview, and added about his earlier statements:

“It’s OK to write that I’m prejudiced. This is as honest as I could possibly be with you. When people become celebrities they change the way they speak. But my conversation with you is exactly the way I would have a conversation on the street. We refer to gay people as f—-ts, as  h–os. It could be disrespectful, but that’s the facts.”

Making light of violence against LGBT people in a time when violent hate crimes are still regularly perpetrated against our community is not only deeply offensive, but also potentially inflammatory.