Iranian Scientist Ali Razeghi Claims He Invented a 'Time Machine'

| by Sarah Fruchtnicht
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A scientist in Tehran claims to have built a time machine that fits inside a personal computer case and allows a person to fast forward in time eight years into the future.

Ali Razeghi, managing director at the state-run Centre for Strategic Inventions, says based on a fingertip impression the device can use algorithms to predict key facts in a user’s life five to eight years into the future.

Razeghi, 27, said The Aryayek Time Traveling Machine can "predict five to eight years of the future life of any individual, with 98 percent accuracy."

He claims Iran could use the device to predict possible military confrontations, oil prices, or the changing value of foreign currencies.

"Naturally a government that can see five years into the future would be able to prepare itself for challenges that might destabilize it," he said. "As such we expect to market this invention among states as well as individuals once we reach a mass production stage."

"I have been working on this project for the last 10 years,” said the scientist, who has 179 other inventions.

Razeghi claimed he has been criticized for the invention by those who say he is “trying to play God.”

"This project is not against our religious values at all," Razeghi said. "The Americans are trying to make this invention by spending millions of dollars on it where I have already achieved it by a fraction of the cost. The reason that we are not launching our prototype at this stage is that the Chinese will steal the idea and produce it in millions overnight."

Reports recently announced Iran’s 3-D mapping tool “Basir” will replace Google Earth. Iran’s minister for information and communications technology, Mohammad Hassan Nami, said “Islamic Google Earth” could launch within the next four months.

“Our values in Iran are the values of God,” Nami told the Guardian, “and this would be the difference between Basir and the Google Earth, which belongs to the ominous triangle of the US, England and the Zionists.”

Sources: The Telegraph, Wired