Who doesn’t understand the impulse to post pictures of people who’ve broken your heart on the internet, especially if those pictures cast that person in a negative light? Dubbed “revenge porn,” sites devoted to this particular kind of public shaming have been around as long as pictures and HTML. In fact, with the prevalence of the internet it is always surprising when something “new” comes along. And while Ariella Alexander’s revenge sites aren’t new, the fact that the person behind them is a suburban mother with two children is at least noteworthy.

Her sites—dubbed She’s A Homewrecker and He’s A Homewrecker—feature mostly non-explicit photos (although still, perhaps not safe for work) and long diatribes written by mostly women the detail the particulars of their personal melodramas. She also, according to Al Jazeera America, runs a private blog called “I’m in Love with a Serial Cheater.” Yet, unlike recent reports of cases in California and New Jersey, nothing Alexander does is illegal. Especially considering that the photos she posts are not exactly explicit, she is protected both by the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and, more specifically, by provisions of the Communications Decency Act of 1996, which protect site owners from legal liability for the actions of their users.

These posts and pictures (which use real names and locations) last far longer than fleeting emotions under which they are posted. Now that employers often run internet searches on potential hires—often with the aim of finding/reading their social media pages—these deeply one-sided screeds become a part of that person’s internet permanent record. However, critics of legislating against revenge porn see it not only as a violation of the right to free expression but also an unnecessary burden to the already overwrought legal/prison system.