Technology

Casinos, Strip Clubs and Theaters Planning to Ban Google Glass

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Though they haven't been released yet, Google Glasses have already been banned from strip clubs, cinemas and casinos as people suspect wearers may be tempted to use them maliciously.

Strip club owners have already said they would ask anyone wearing the device to remove it or leave, as they do not want patrons filming the dancers.

Sapphire Gentlemen's Club in Las Vegas has said they would ask people to check their glasses when they come in.

"We've been dealing with the cellphone videoing and the picture taking over the years and we are quick to make sure that that doesn't happen in the club," managing partner Peter Feinstein said. "As the sale of [Google Glass] spreads, there'll be more people using them and wanting to use them at places such as a gentlemen's club. If we see those in the club, we would do the same thing that we do to people who bring cameras into the club."

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"If they don't want to check it, we'd be happy to give them a limo ride back to their hotel."

The eyewear has a small camera on the front of it that does not make a sound when filming, so others do not know if they are being recorded or not.

Casino owners also are against the wearing of Google Glass inside their establishments, as it could be used for cheating.

A spokesman for MGM resorts said, "Security officers on duty ask individuals not to take pictures for the privacy of others in the casino. This new product is nothing new in terms of a challenge for us, because for so many years, the very tiniest of portable lipstick and pinpoint cameras have been around."

And cinemas across the US are also planning to ban them, as they could be used to film movies.

In other countries, people donning similar devices have already encountered issues with wearing it in public.

One University of Toronto computer engineering professor, Steve Mann, said he was at a McDonalad's in Paris when an employee tried to remove a similar pair of glasses from his head.

Sources: Daily Mail, Complex