Bing Autocomplete Search Creates Map Of What Each U.S. State ‘Is’

| by Khier Casino

The Seattle-based real estate startup Estately conducted an experiment using Bing’s autocomplete to create a map of what each U.S. state “is.”

They used the first declarative statement sentence according to Bing autocomplete, and got rid of anything in question form. What did they find in their search? “There are large pockets of racists, northern states like to praise themselves, Texas is emo, nobody likes California or New York, and Hawaii is filled with liars,” notes the employees of Estately, who say that the results below do not reflect their views or beliefs.

Only 38 U.S. states have one-of-a-kind autocomplete descriptions, as of January 2014. Results for the search query “[State] is…” are as follows:

Alaska: cold

Arkansas: a $#!*hole

Colorado: legal

Connecticut: anti gun

Delaware: workers comp exclusive remedy

District of Columbia: a foreign corporation

Florida: for nurses

Georgia: a right to work state

Hawaii: no paradise

Idaho: the most corrupt state

Illinois: broke

Iowa: boring Yahoo

Kansas: being poisoned

Kentucky: a state Family Guy

Louisiana: a weird state

Maine: beautiful

Maryland: a southern state

Massachusetts: a coffin

Michigan: vendor

Minnesota: more corrupt than acknowledged

Montana: for badasses

Nevada: the most mountainous state

New Jersey: ilanlari

New Mexico: horrible

New York: a dump

North Carolina: my home

North Dakota: not a state

Oklahoma: suing the Obama administration

Oregon: faster Nike

Pennsylvania: a nice place to visit

Rhode Island: famous for you

South Carolina: too small to be a republic

South Dakota: K2 illegal

Texas: the reason

Utah: on track to end homelessness

Virginia: for lovers 14k

Washington: the best

Wyoming: the cowboy state

This is not the first time autocomplete was used to define the U.S. map. Mashable conducted a similar experiment, this time using Google’s autocomplete to create a map of what each state “wants.” For example, Wyoming wants “an aircraft carrier,” while Florida simply wants “to know.”