Technology

New Apple Technology Would Allow Police To Stop People From Recording Brutality With Cell Phones (Video)

| by Dominic Kelly

In many recent instances of police brutality, witnesses have been able to catch the action on cell phone videos for evidence. Now, a technology developed by Apple will reportedly help police block people from taking pictures or recording video on their phones.

Apple has an active patent filed for a technology that would essentially block people from snapping pictures of shooting video of situations with their cell phones if the police choose to use it.

“Those policies would be activated by GPS, and WiFi or mobile-base stations, which would ring-fence around a building or a ‘sensitive area’ to prevent phone cameras from taking pictures or recording video,” describes Ana Kasparian of The Young Turks.

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

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A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

The patent itself describes the use and points out some positive aspects of the technology.

“As wireless devices such as cellular telephones, pagers, personal media devices and smartphones become ubiquitous, more and more people are carrying these devices in various social and professional settings,” the patent reads. “The result is that these wireless devices can often annoy, frustrate, and even threaten people in sensitive venues. For example, cell phones with loud ringers frequently disrupt meetings, the presentation of movies, religious ceremonies, weddings, funerals, academic lectures, and test-taking environments.”

It goes on to say, however, that police and government agencies can use it to “blackout” conditions during covert operations or situations where they don’t want people to be using cell phones. While this also has a positive side, many people see it as a means for police forces to cover up brutality.

The patent itself is actually nothing new, as it was filed in 2012, and so far, it doesn’t appear that it has gone anywhere.