Religion in Society

Supreme Court Hears "Mojave Desert Cross" Case

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WASHINGTON -- Today the U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments in Salazar vs. Buono, better known as the Mojave Desert Cross case. World War I veterans erected a cross 75 years ago on land that was open range to honor those who had died serving America in the war. In 1994, the Clinton Administration federalized the land. The ACLU sued to remove the cross, which is literally in a desert and difficult to find, on behalf of a former National Park Service worker who lives in Oregon.

The case will impact all "religious displays" on federal land.

Wendy Wright, President of Concerned Women for America, stated at a press conference:

"The cross is the most profound symbol of the most humble act of service -- to lay down one's life for another. It was veterans who chose the cross to symbolize the service of their brothers and sisters in the military who laid down their lives to keep our country free.

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This judge looked an inmate square in the eyes and did something that left the entire courtroom in tears:

"It's quite telling that the ACLU and atheists' response is not an alternate symbol. They have nothing to offer in place of the cross. Instead they cover up the cross with ugly plywood. They oppress, they censor, they silence the most profound message that can be offered to our country.

"So the Supreme Court has the opportunity now to do the right thing and to honor those who give their lives for our country and to respect the religious views of the majority of Americans, particularly those who founded our country. They have the opportunity to recognize that our country is in fact founded on Judeo-Christian principles. The Supreme Court has the opportunity to do the right thing and allow the cross to stand.

"If they choose otherwise, they will then have to bulldoze Arlington Cemetery. Next will be scratching off 'In God We Trust' from our coins and dollar bills and sandblasting Biblical quotes and symbols from our nation's most revered buildings and memorials."

Concerned Women for America is the nation's largest public policy women's organization.