Study: Educated Women Have Higher Rates of Alcoholism

| by Chris Scalise Opposing Views

A new article in the UK Telegraph points to a new study illustrating an interesting corrleation between alcohol consumption and education, particularly among women. The article refers to a comprehensive study conducted by the London School of Economics in which researchers followed thousands of 39-year-old British men and women born the same week in 1970.

The study concluded that women with college degrees were almost twice as likely to drink daily than women lacking a college education. There was a similar correlation among men, although not as strong.

The study concluded: "The more educated women are, the more likely they are to drink alcohol on most days and to report having problems due to their drinking patterns.

"The better-educated appear to be the ones who engage the most in problematic patterns of alcohol consumption."

But why would educated women have higher rates of alcoholism than their uneducated counterparts? According to the report:

"Reasons for the positive association of education and drinking behaviours may include: a more intensive social life that encourages alcohol intake; a greater engagement into traditionally male spheres of life, a greater social acceptability of alcohol use and abuse; more exposure to alcohol use during formative years; and greater postponement of childbearing and its responsibilities among the better educated,"