The move was a long time coming, but on Thursday U.S. Soccer made it official: Bob Bradley was dismissed as coach of the men’s national team.

"We want to thank Bob Bradley for his service and dedication to U.S. Soccer during the past five years," U.S. Soccer president Sunil Gulati said in a statement. "During his time as the head coach of our Men's National Team he led the team to a number of accomplishments, but we felt now was the right time for us to make a change.

"It is always hard to make these decisions, especially when it involves someone we respect as much as Bob. We wish him the best in his future endeavors."

The timing is still strange, considering the U.S. almost parted ways with Bradley after a disappointing run at the 2010 World Cup in South Africa. Although Bradley survived that -- he couldn't shake the perception that his team was spinning in place.

Bradley's group came up short at the Gold Cup with an embarrassing 2-1 loss to Panama and a terribly one-sided 4-2 loss versus Mexico in the championship game. That coupled with a recent history of unimpressive showings all but sealed Bradley’s fate.

Originally, Bradley was brought in January 2007 to restore some dignity to U.S. men’s soccer. He was mildly successful at remolding the team and even led them to the round of 16 at the 2010 World Cup in South Africa. With the improving results, however, came higher expectations – ones that Bradley ultimately was unable to meet.

Bradley’s career overall mark with the team was 43-25-12.

Now the attention turns to his successor. Will U.S. Soccer stick with an American or will U.S. Soccer consider a foreign-born coach? There has been speculation that Jurgen Klinsmann, the former German national team coach, has been high on the Americans' list.

Klinsmann makes his home in Southern California so the logistics make sense.

Klinsmann preaches a high-intensity attack, which is something the American's sorely lacked against the more plodding style employed by Bradley.