Vikings Adrian Peterson Can’t Change Jersey Number Because of Interesting NFL Rule

| by Alex Groberman

It’s not easy to stop Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson from doing what he wants to do, but that’s precisely what the NFL did this week by bringing a previously unheard of rule to his attention.

Last week, Peterson made headlines when he noted that he was considering changing from his current No. 28 jersey to something else. Although he had worn this number since high school, he had apparently grown tired of it and was ready for a change.

Problem was, as he eventually found out, the NFL wasn’t ready for him to be ready for a change.

In a bunch of Twitter posts on Wednesday, Peterson told his followers that he couldn’t switch numbers because the NFL requires players to buy remaining stock of their old jersey before changing to a new number. According to Peterson, buying up his old jerseys would have cost him something in the $1 million range.

As per his Twitter (via ESPN):

"So I received a call and I was informed that I would (have) to buy all jerseys that's been produced (t)hus far!" Peterson wrote. "(And) the total amount that I would have to pay blew my mind!!!!!"

"Ok so I see maybe ten thousand dollars of my total jersey sales! That's it!!!" Peterson wrote, referring to a player's cut of the licensing fee.

"(And) I know I've mostly likely been in the top ten (w)hen it comes to top sales ! Why in the hell do I have to pay a Million dollars to change my number! I don't even get paid a million (d)ollars by my sponsors a year! Wow!!! (And) I'm talking about my (N)ike deal!"

"You must be smoking something to thin(k) I'll (w)aste that type of money just to change a number on my work uniform!" Peterson wrote.

This previously unheard of NFL rule has generated a lot of backlash from football fans over the last 24 hours. A player not being able to change his number, in theory, doesn’t seem right. But the fact of the matter is, it also wouldn’t be right for the NFL to have to pay for additional jersey manufacturing costs every single time a player (on a whim) decided to swap their current number for another.

And it’s not as if the league is really telling Peterson he can’t have another jersey number. The league is merely saying that if the talented running back wants a new jersey number, he has to reimburse them for payments they made for his old jerseys.

Seems fair.

What do you think?

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