Sports

Native Americans Protest ‘Redskins’ Name Outside Last Home Game (Video)

| by Michael Allen

Native American protesters marched and waved signs on some church property outside FedEx Field in Washington D.C. to protest the Redskins' team name during their last home game.

The road near the property is walked by thousands of tailgaters on their way to the stadium.

According to The Washington Post, about 100 Native Americans took part on Sunday and held signs that read, "NO HONOR IN RACISM” and “CHANGE THE NAME.”

The protesters yelled, “We are people, not your mascots," reports RT.com (video below).

Redskins fan Darrell Pearson, who claimed to be part Native American, pointed at his Redskins jersey and chanted back at the protesters, “Cherokee!”

 “It doesn’t bother me a bit,” Pearson told The Washington Post. “Are we going to stop calling peanuts redskins?”

One man wearing a hat that looked like a hog told the demonstrators that they had no reason to protest the name.

“Another example of white people telling other people what they ought to be,” a Native American protester countered.

Some fans chanted “Hail to the Redskins,” while others made obscene gestures.

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John Woodrow Cox, a reporter for The Washington Post, tweeted, "A #Redskins fan screaming expletives at the passing protesters at #ChangeTheMascot rally."

Mike Wise, also a reporter with The Post, posted a picture of a young girl protesting the Redskins' name with the caption, "The adults getting into it is one thing. When fans on way to game mock this little girl, it makes you cringe."

According to Deadspin.com, "NFL announcers said the word 'Redskins' 472 fewer times this regular season than in 2013, a decrease of 27%. We expected the Washington nickname controversy to impact how announcers called games, but not to this degree; in fact, yesterday's slate of broadcasts only found 'Redskins' being mentioned 13 times."

Sources: Deadspin.com, The Washington Post, Twitter, RT.com
Image Credit: YouTube Screenshot