Dolphins Brandon Marshall Admits to Dealing with BPD

| by Alex Groberman

Miami Dolphins wide receiver Brandon Marshall has always been a difficult character to peg. Now, the controversial NFL star has finally decided to explain to the world why his behavior has been so chaotic over the past few years – he has Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD).

“The longer that BPD, Borderline Personality Disorder, goes untreated the worse it gets as you all have seen my life publicly,” Marshall said (as transcribed by the Miami Herald). “I would have thrown away my career, and there was a good possibility my life. I’m still suffering from the consequences of this. Another reason why I am so passionate it is because I may lose my wife still and that hurts me. I am a very passionate person.”

Marshall would go on to say that he believed his BPD took effect heavily after his rookie season in 2006. It was at this point, according to him, that “traumatic relationships with family members and a past relationship” began to weigh heavily in his mind.

Although the Dolphins wide receiver didn’t specifically cite the incident, New Years 2007 marked the day that his friend and teammate, Denver Broncos cornerback Darrant Williams, was shot outside of a Denver nightclub. Witness reports later noted that it was a dispute between the shooter, Willie Clark, and Marshall that led to the shooting.

“It became a point where I thought that’s who I was,” Marshall said. “My wife used to say to me, ‘I want my old Brandon back.’ She used to say to me that I am not affectionate, I am not there emotionally and I never understood that.

“I would like to thank the Dolphins because the way they handled me was so professional and made me feel like family because they kept a lot of our issues in house,” Marshall said. “Like I said, there is a lot of validity behind how I felt, and my actions and my behavior was inappropriate at times. There was a lot of conflict with me and the coaches, and the way I handled it was inappropriate and I react at a high emotion. There is one day I had all right to be [ticked], and I just exploded and I told everybody how I felt. And then afterwards I felt really bad. I went to [running back] Ricky [Williams] and said, ‘Do you think I have something wrong with me because I can’t understand why I can control myself?’ Ricky said ‘You say the things that we all want to say but won’t ever say.’ During the season that was my first time I had so much conflict like that.”

Some point to this as a healthy first step for Marshall on the road to a more peaceful, serene experience with his current club.

The Dolphins recently brought ex-New Orleans Saints running back Reggie Bush into the fold, a move that many expect should open the field up for Marshall to be more effective.