Sports

Former NBA Referee Troy Raymond Kills Self Following Wife's Murder

| by Mark Berman Opposing Views

A former NBA referee who was fired for lying about his background has been found dead of an apparent suicide -- just hours after his wife was murdered in their house. Police say he was a "person of interest" in that killing.

According to a report from CBSSports.com, the body of 46-year-old Troy Raymond was found dead in a hotel room in New Orleans last Friday. He died of a gunshot wound to the head.

Hours earlier, the body of his wife Leslie, 41, was found strangled in the couple's Houston-area home.

"We're not prepared to tell you who's responsible," Constable Tim Holifield of Montgomery County Precinct Three told the website. "But certainly Mr. Raymond is a person of interest -- and his death brings about more questions than answers."

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Sources told CBSSports.com that Raymond's wife had recently asked for a divorce and he had just learned that he would not be rehired to officiate college games next season.

Raymond was an NBA referee for just one season, but was fired in 2004 for lying on his resume. Among other things, he said he was an Air Force pilot (he was not) and that he played on the 1990 University of Colorado football team that won the national championship (he did not).

Raymond then turned to the college level, working games in the Southland and Sun Belt conferences.

His former NBA colleagues remember his short-lived career.

"There were rumors about his dishonesty all over the place. That story about the Air Force had a lot of holes in it," one NBA referee who requested anonymity told the New York Daily News. 

"He was a very intelligent guy," said another ref. "He was a decent referee. It's just that he got caught in those lies and that's what crushed him. He never got it going again on the college level, in terms of getting back to a high level of officiating again. It's just a sad story."