Hall of Fame Catcher Gary Carter Dies at 57

| by Mark Berman Opposing Views

Sad news in the world of baseball -- Hall of Fame catcher Gary Carter died Thursday at age 57.

Carter was diagnosed with four brain tumors last May. Initial chemotherapy and other treatments were effective in stopping the tumors from growing, but last month new tumors were found. reports that Carter's daughter Kimmy Bloemers announced the news on the family's website:

"I am deeply saddened to tell you all that my precious dad went to be with Jesus today at 4:10 pm. This is the most difficult thing I have ever had to write in my entire life but I wanted you all to know. He is in heaven and has reunited with his mom and dad. I believe with all my heart that dad had a STANDING OVATION as he walked through the gates of heaven to be with Jesus."

MLB commissioner Bud Selig said in a statement:

"Driven by a remarkable enthusiasm for the game, Gary Carter became one of the elite catchers of all-time. 'The Kid' was an 11-time All-Star and a durable, consistent slugger for the Montreal Expos and the New York Mets, and he ranks among the most beloved players in the history of both of those franchises. Like all baseball fans, I will always remember his leadership for the '86 Mets and his pivotal role in one of the greatest World Series ever played."

In the greatest game of that great World Series, the famous Game 6, Carter was the one who sparked the amazing Mets comeback. Down two runs with two outs in the tenth inning, Carter singled to extend the game. The Mets went on to score three runs to win the game, and then Game 7. Carter later said he didn't want to be the one to make the last out.

In a statement Mets ownership said:

“On behalf of everyone at the Mets, we extend our deepest and heartfelt condolences to Gary’s family — his wife Sandy, daughters Christy and Kimmy and son D.J.  His nickname ‘The Kid’ captured how Gary approached life.  He did everything with enthusiasm and with gusto on and off the field.  His smile was infectious. He guided our young pitching staff to the World Series title in 1986 and he devoted an equal amount of time and energy raising awareness for a multitude of charities and community causes.  He was a Hall of Famer in everything he did.”

Carter played 19 big league seasons, hitting 324 home runs. He was the dominant catcher during his time in the majors and in 2003 he was inducted into the Hall of Fame.