Mark Sanchez' Season, Career With Jets May Be Over

| by Sylvan Lane
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New York Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez’ tenure with Gang Green has be tumultuous to say the least. Now, you can add a potential season-ending injury to the list of problems he’s faced in the NFL.

Dr. James Andrews confirmed to ESPN Wednesday that Mark Sanchez tore the right labrum in his right, throwing shoulder, and is "likely to have surgery,” according to team and league sources, as well as a source close to Sanchez. The surgery would end his 2013 season, and leave the Jets offense in the hands of rookie quarterback Geno Smith.

Sanchez who is still trying to make a final decision on whether to have the surgery told ESPN late Wednesday night via text message, "If I needed surgery right now, I never would have left Andrews' office. I would've stayed and got the surgery." Asked if he wanted to deny that he was likely to have surgery, Sanchez texted: "There's nothing to report. It's reckless."

Labrums cannot heal on their own—only through surgery—and Sanchez’ decision would likely be based on how effective he could be at passing with a torn labrum, and if he would still be a better option than Smith, who the Jets drafted from West Virginia University in the second round of 2013 NFL Draft.

Smith won the first start of his career in Sunday's 18-17 victory over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. The rookie led a late, game-winning drive, albeit aided by a key penalty. Smith finished 24 of 38 passes for 256 yards and a touchdown while leading the team with 47 yards rushing.

According to, Sanchez’ days with the Jets just may be done.

“If Sanchez's 2013 season indeed is lost, it's a near certainty he has played his last snap with the Jets, a team he helped lead to back-to-back AFC Championship Game appearances in his first two NFL seasons.

“With rookie Geno Smith coming off a Week 1 victory, it would be seen as a step backward to re-insert Sanchez into the starting lineup. Now it appears Sanchez's health could make that option a moot point,” writes Dan Hanzus

Sources: ESPN,