Manny Pacquiao vs. Floyd Mayweather: 1 Less Legal Obstacle

| by Alex Groberman

There is now one less obstacle standing in the way of a Manny Pacquiao versus Floyd Mayweather superfight taking place.

Around the same time Pacquiao got some very good legal news, his arch rival was getting some great legal news of his own.

Last Wednesday, Mayweather was found not guilty of two counts of misdemeanor harassment by Las Vegas Justice of the Peace, Diana Sullivan. The incident stemmed from a serious confrontation he had with a pair of security guards over parking tickets.

Mayweather, apparently, stumbled upon the guards, Miguel Burgos and Aaron Ryan ticketing at least four of his vehicles outside of his $9.5 million mansion early in the morning. Needless to say, he reacted poorly to the situation.  

"These are my (expletive) cars, don't touch my (expletive) cars," the boxer told the guards, according to testimony.

As per the judge, the evidence in the case was not sufficient to prove that Mayweather was a legitimate threat to cause bodily harm to the guards in question – either by himself or directing someone else to do it.

Or, as Sullivan explained it: "That these witnesses were in fear of their safety or in fear that Mr. Mayweather was actually going to go get his homies and take care of it or take care of them."

The judge agreed that while Mayweather could have been charged with disorderly conduct, a harassment charge simply wouldn’t fly.

After Sullivan made the decision, the security guards in question told reporters that they didn’t want to testify against Mayweather anyway, because they feared retaliation from the undefeated champion.

So what does this mean for a potential Pacquiao vs. Mayweather bout? It means there is one less excuse for the two men to restart negotiations.

Mayweather took a long sabbatical prior to his last victory against Victor Ortiz to get his house in order, and to deal with his many, many legal problems. Similarly, Pacquiao has been distracted over the last few months due to a myriad of legal, personal and professional problems.

Now everyone’s distractions are more or less gone.

The truth is, despite everything that’s happened, there is really no better time for Pacquiao and Mayweather to restart their negotiations. Both men are at the apex of their careers. Both men would demand a huge amount of public interest. And, most importantly, both men don’t have too many out-of-the-ring distractions to keep them from sitting down and working out the kinks.

Will it happen? Probably not.

But at least Mayweather’s settled court case leaves them one less excuse to use as to why they’re not arranging the fight of the decade.