Sports

Floyd Mayweather, Manny Pacquiao Need a Lesson in Compromise

| by Alex Groberman

It’s a fairly easy concept to grasp, yet it's strangely lost on both Manny Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather Jr.

From a very early age, children of all cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds are taught a few fundamental ideals. Among the more well-known principles -- like treating others well and not cutting off your husband's penis and throwing it in the garbage dispoal -- lays a very logical and reasonable idea: Know how to compromise.

Popular Video

Miranda Lambert saw the sign a veteran was holding up at her concert, she immediately broke down in tears:

Popular Video

Miranda Lambert saw the sign a veteran was holding up at her concert, she immediately broke down in tears:

Mayweather and Pacquiao seem to have missed the day that lesson was taught in school. For whatever reason, both of these amazingl -talented boxers feel that the world revolves around them and that no matter what the fans, critics and everyone in between desires, it’s their feelings and their wants that come above all else.

The history of blame-shifting on why a super fight has not yet occurred indicates this much.

Just look at it from the very beginning. Mayweather, supposedly, returns to boxing after an extended break in order to reclaim his “best pound-for-pound” fighter in the world status from the Filipino superstar. Randomly, he demands a drug test unlike anything that would generally be expected under the circumstances. Then, when Pacquiao eventually agrees to the original drug testing requests, Mayweather suddenly decides that the original deal isn’t good enough and throws out a whole new proposal.

This type of behavior isn’t even moderately reasonable.

Pacquiao, of course, is no better. First there was an assortment of excuses regarding why he wouldn’t adhere to the testing specifications that his undefeated counterpart set forth. But when Mayweather was agitated and didn’t want to negotiate for the fight anymore, Pacquiao suddenly decides that the original testing requirements would suffice and agrees to them in the least opportune time frame ever. Why couldn’t he just have agreed to Mayweather’s demands right off the bat?

And in Pacquiao’s latest puzzling decision, he has made it clear -- through mouthpiece Bob Arum -- that he doesn’t trust the USADA to conduct the tests for a potential super fight between him and Mayweather. What in the world does the USADA have to gain by skewing more favorably in Mayweather’s direction? Why would it risk its hard-won credibility for some loudmouthed boxer who represents a fraction of the activity that goes through their facilities? If they lie about even one thing, they’re done. Game over. Close up shop.

Pacquiao’s suspicions about USADA are ludicrous on all fronts.

Both men’s self-centered and unreasonable inherent natures are clearly to blame for why this fight hasn’t occurred yet. If either one or the other opted to compromise even a little bit, this whole ridiculous freak show circus that has gone on for over a year could have been easily averted.

If Mayweather and Pacquiao have any respect for themselves or their fans, they’ll realize that nobody in this world gets everything they want. It’s just not possible. If they really want to fight each other to determine who the greatest pound-for-pound boxer in the sport is, they have to find a middle ground.

Unless of course they’re content to bicker through the press and permanently damage their legacies by not committing to the one and only fight anyone wants to see. If that’s what they want then they’re most certainly on the right path to boxing irrelevance.