Society

YouTube Helps Twins Separated At Birth Discover Each Other

| by Jonathan Wolfe

Imagine living almost 30 years as a lone sibling only to find that not only do you have a long lost sibling, but you have a twin.

This stunning realization is precisely what happened to Anais Bordier and Samantha Futerman last year.

Futerman and Bordier were separated at birth and adopted by different families. They lived their whole lives without a clue of the other’s existence.

In February 2013,  Futerman received message on Facebook from someone named Anais Bordier. Bordier had seen one of Futerman’s YouTube videos and couldn’t help but reach out to her.

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“[The message] said she had seen me in a YouTube video, then after looking my name up online, saw that we were both adopted, and born on the same day, in the same city,” Futerman said. “When I saw her profile, it was crazy. She looked just like me.”

Here’s the full message Bordier sent to Futerman after seeing her:

The women both agreed they looked uncannily like one another. They decided to dig up some information about their pasts and, sure enough, they were born on the same day in the same hospital.

To prove concretely what they more or less already knew, Futerman and Bordier took DNA tests. When the results came back, it was official: they were twins. Just like that, the self-proclaimed “twinsters” started their new lives together.

The women have captured over 42,000 moments on film together in the year following their discovery. They launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise money to make a documentary about their experience. So far, the campaign has raised almost $80,000.

One year later, the joy of finding a long-lost twin is just as strong as the day they met.

Futerman said the feeling of knowing her sister is like “…that feeling on Christmas when you open up the presents, the one you were asking for, it's that - that pure feeling of joy - that's how I always feel.”

Sources: Mail Online, Patch