Yale Faces Record Number of Sexual Assaults on Campus

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Yale is facing a high number of sexual assault cases after a number of students came forward and revealed they were harassed.

The school first came under federal investigation in 2011 after 15 students filed a complaint saying the school was a “hostile sexual environment,” and that the school failed to deal with sexual harassment incidents.

Evidence includes a video of Yale fraternity pledges holding a sign saying “We love Yale sluts” and chanting “No Means Yes.”

In the second half of 2011, a Yale committee said 14 sexual assaults were reported. The assaults include a rape and unwanted touching. In 2012, 13 attacks were reported.

Another report showed that in 2011, the school had 37 sexual assaults, an increase from the 21 attacks in 2010.

But the statistics likely do not reflect the real situation, since many cases go unreported.

A report by the Yale committee details some specific assaults. Included are the rapes of two female students and a woman who said two men raped her. One male also said he was sexually harassed by a Yale faculty member.

Assistant Dean of Student Affairs Melanie Boyd said, “It is a moment at Yale, and on many, many other campuses, where we are really grappling with these historical sexual misconduct rates. How do we effectively intervene with that?”

Boyd said the school has to tell police if a student is raped, but she said many students are hesitant to file a report.

The school usually addresses the matter by moving students accused of sexual misconduct to other classes and offering counseling.

Since the increase in sexual assaults, new programs have been introduced at the school to encourage the reporting of sexual assaults.

Universities and colleges throughout America are required to report sexual assaults as part of the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act.

Named after Jeanne Clery, who was raped at Lehigh University, the legislation makes reports available to prospective students on all university websites.

Daily Mail, Courant