Society

Demolition Crew Destroys Family's Home By Mistake

| by Ray Brown

Two Texas homeowners are in shock after a demolition company tore down their house by mistake.

Lindsay Diaz and Alan Cutter both own sides of a duplex in Rowlett, Texas, a suburb of Dallas. A tornado there in December 2015 came into contact with their home and left significant damage, but the structures remained and they were waiting for insurance and federal payments to rebuild, according to WFAA.

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But then a demolition company misread an address, and smashed their home to a pile of rubble on March 22.

“How do you make a mistake like this?" Diaz asked WFFA. "I mean, this is just the worst."

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Apparently, the Billy L. Nabors Demolition crew mixed up 7601 Cousteau Drive, the address of the home it was supposed to tear down, with 7601 Calypso Drive, one block away, according to WFFA. The crew even texted the news station a Google Maps photo showing arrows for “7601 Cousteau” pointing at Diaz's home.

But the Nabors team did realize its mistake soon after tearing down the home and drove down the block to demolish the correct house.

While it's rare for a demolition team to tear down the wrong house, it does happen.

"It happens more than you think," real estate mogul Barbara Corcoran told ABC News. "You could probably find at least one home wrecked in just about every city across the United States, by mistake. And how is it always explained? Human error."

In fact, it happened recently not far from Diaz.

In 2013, the City of Fort Worth, Texas, about 35 minutes from Rowlett, mistakenly told a demolition crew to tear down the home of David and Valerie Underwood.

“My wife was the first one to notice,” David Underwood told the Fort-Worth Star-Telegram. “I was looking down by the lake to see if it needed mowing, and she said, ‘David, the house is gone.’ I was in shock and disbelief. How can the house be gone?”

The Underwoods and the city eventually agreed on a $102,500 settlement.

It's not yet clear what will happen to Diaz and Cutter.

Sources: WFAA, ABC News, Fort Worth Star-Telegram / Photo credit: Rhys A./Flickr

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