Women Flash Controversial Signs At Drivers (Photos)

| by Sheena Vasani
Texting and DrivingTexting and Driving

Some Texas drivers are probably shocked to see what these two women are flashing at them.

For the past decade, Holly Seltz and Dedee Jones have been flashing signs like, "Hang up the phone and drive" and "Are you in a hurry?" at distracted drivers in the Houston area, KHOU reports.

The two hope to help encourage safer driving and ultimately save lives.

"We've seen people go up on curbs, almost hit the car beside them or in front of them," explains Jones.

But not everyone welcomes the signs, with a few people flipping them off every now and then.

"[One time] a lady came out of her car and came back to -- we just locked the doors -- she smiled and looked like she was going to beat us up," recalls Seltz.

Even their family members aren't fans.

"My husband hates the signs," smiles Jones, whose own embarrassed children have gone so far to hide them.

The signs have also provoked mixed reactions among many on social media.

"How about 'Shut up and mind your own business,'" writes Dave Goerg on KING's Facebook post about the women. "The road is a big enough distraction. The last thing someone needs is a sign being flashed at them to distract them and quite possibly start a nice bout of road rage. MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS!"

Others praised the women and said they try to battle distracted driving in their own ways.

"I sometimes honk at them and point at their phone," writes Dixie Smith. "When I'm walking and they have an open window, I yell at them to kill it. Entertaining for me, sometimes they look ignorant, shocked, angry, and/or embarrassed. Other times, they just look entitled."

Regardless of the varied responses, creative ways to tackle distracted driving is needed.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, every day thousands are injured and nearly 10 people die from distracted driving.

In 2013, nearly 1 in 5 injuries from car crashes were the result of drivers not giving the road their full attention.

Sources: KHOU, KING 5/Facebook, CDC / Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons

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