Society

Victoria's Secret 'Perfect Body' Campaign Sparks Controversy

| by Jonathan Wolfe

Victoria’s Secret is facing some all too familiar criticism today. The women’s fashion giant is being blasted for their new, controversially-titled “The Perfect Body” campaign.

One campaign poster in particular seems to be eliciting the most criticism. The poster features three very thin, underwear-clad models with the words “The Perfect Body” written over them. The company is once again under fire for calling a body type "ideal" or, to use their words, "perfect," when it is completely unrealistic for the vast majority of women.

It didn’t take long for criticisms to start pouring in. Here’s a sampling of them:

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In addition to the Twitterverse outrage, a petition on Change.org is demanding that Victoria’s Secret end the campaign.

“This [campaign] promotes low self-esteem among women who are made to feel that their bodies are inadequate and unattractive because they do not fit into this narrow standard of beauty,” the petition says. “This endorses dangerous beliefs about women’s bodies and their value, which contributes to a culture that promotes serious health problems such as low self-esteem, negative body image and eating disorders.

“Victoria’s Secret is hugely popular among young women, and they have a crucial responsibility to not use harmful and unhealthy ideas to market their products. We would like Victoria’s Secret to take responsibility for their irresponsibility.”

A number of people who signed the petition chimed in with comments.

“I’m signing because body shaming is disgusting,” signee Samantha McGettigan wrote. “Why can’t you just accept everyone is different. It also shows a negative body image to our growing girls and idolizes women for men. We aren’t all skinny minis and that needs to be accepted sooner rather than later.”

“I’m tired of being told I look unhappy because I don’t look a certain way,” Sophia Binns added.

“Body shaming is irresponsible and damaging,” Hannah Welby argues. “As is setting a specific standard of beauty and perfection. As women we need to be encouraged and celebrated in all our appearances and not pigeonholed. For male campaigns this can also be an issue that needs addressing.”

Victoria's Secret is yet to respond to the complaints.

Sources: Metro, Huffington Post, Change.org