Society

Trustee Wants to Sell Rights to Casey Anthony Story to Settle Debts

| by Sarah Fruchtnicht
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The trustee overseeing Casey Anthony’s bankruptcy case has filed a motion to sell the rights to her life story.

Trustee Stephen Meininger asked for permission to sell the "exclusive worldwide rights" of Anthony's life story from Judge K. Rodney May in Tampa federal court Friday.

In 2011, Anthony, who turns 27 years old today, was acquitted of the 2008 murder of her two-year-old daughter Caylee.

Anthony claims she has been unemployed since the acquittal, living off funds from her attorney Jose Baez and unsolicited gift cards donated by strangers. According to court documents she is currently $792,000 in debt with only $1,000 in assets. Her loose-fitting clothing at her bankruptcy hearing in early March led to tabloid speculation that she might be pregnant, but that apparently isn't true.

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Anthony’s story has value and should be auctioned to the highest bidder, Meininger said through his attorney, calling it the "best way to maximize the value for the Estate and its creditors."

He wrote that one man has offered to pay $10,000 for Anthony's story so that she would not be able to publish or profit from it in the future.

Selling the rights to Anthony's story would not require her approval. In Meininger's motion, the intimate details of Anthony’s life, including her childhood, is referred to as “the Property.” It reads: "Due to the intense public interest in Debtor and the Property, the Trustee believes that there will be interest from others in purchasing the Property."

A lot of time in court racked up some hefty debt for Anthony, including $500,000 in attorney fees and costs for Jose Baez, $145,600 for the Orange County Sheriff’s office for investigative fees and costs, $68,540 for the Internal Revenue Services, and $61,505 for the Florida Department of Law Enforcement for court costs.

Sources: Huffington Post, Fox News